Live Chat
1-888-369-5603 44-20-7183-0318 61-28-014-8214

Dentistry term paper

[...]
"Dummett functioned in major leadership roles outside of the dental academy. He served as an ADA Delegate to the National Citizens Committee for the World Health Organization. A commissioned Major in the United States Air Force, he was assigned to active duty in Anchorage Alaska as Chief of Periodontics and Oral Medicine and Consultant in Periodontics of the Alaska Air Command. He received numerous awards while in the military and retired in 1979 after 24 years of service. As an advisor and assistant to seven presidents of the National Dental Association (NDA), the nation's leading dental association for racial/ethnic minorities, in 1957 he originated the first NDA resolution to the ADA to eliminate racially exclusive and restrictive membership; this led to the 1962 resolution to refuse to seat delegates from any state whose racial bylaws conflicted with those of the ADA. Dr. Dummett served for 22 years as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the National Dental Association. He also edited the journal of the American Association of Dental Educators and served on its Board of Directors. Dummett has written more than 300 articles and 12 books and contributed chapters to many other books. In 1966, Dummett was appointed Chief of Dental Service at the VA. Hospital in Chicago, Illinois; in 1967, elected Vice-President of the International Association for Dental Research; and, in 1969-70, he became President of the International Association for Dental Research, while serving as President of the American Association for Dental Research. At the request of the Office of Economic Opportunity, Dummett was granted leave from the VA. Hospital Dental Service to become the Dental Director of the South Central Multipurpose Health Service Centre, in Los Angeles, California. In 1968, he was appointed Project and Health Centre Director, becoming the first dentist in the nation to serve as head of a federally funded community health centre (CHC)."
[...]

 

[...]
"An important goal of evidence based dental clinical practice guidelines is to provide dentists with a professional standard and to serve as a basis for continuing dental education. However, not much is known about the attitudes, expectations, and opinions of dentists towards the development and use of clinical practice guidelines. Much attention has been given to the scientific validity and reliability of guidelines, but research into factors that may be decisive for their use in clinical practice is still scarce. Before starting to develop guidelines it is valuable to understand the characteristics that make them effective. Several studies have focused on the appropriate use of guidelines in daily practice. Confidence in the quality of the guideline and the credibility of the group that developed it are essential for the acceptance of a guideline. Although many factors may be similar to those applicable to general physicians, there may also be considerable differences in medical and dental practice given the different funding and organisational structures . Moreover, in dentistry a notable move towards a more profession centred approach has been observed. A better insight into the opinions and preferences of dentists may be helpful in the implementation of future guidelines, thus increasing the acceptance by practitioners. This paper assesses the opinions of general dental practitioners towards the development, use, and barriers of evidence based clinical practice guidelines and their contribution to the quality of dental care."
[...]

 

[...]
"The average sound pressure level of the idling noise of the new high-speed micromotor hand pieces and the new high-speed air-turbine hand pieces in the one-third octave bands of 2580,000 Hz were measured.
During idling, when the water spray was turned off and the air pressure adjusted to its maximum value, the average A-weighted sound pressure level of the new and old hand pieces (n = 20) was 65-76 dB(A). During drilling, when both the water spray and the air pressure were adjusted to their maximum value, the average A-weighted sound pressure level of the new and old hand pieces was 76-82 dB(A). During the simulated work the average A-weighted sound pressure level of the power suction tube was 77 dB(A), the saliva suction tube 75 dB(A), and the ultrasonic scaler 83 dB(A). During drilling the average ultrasound levels of the hand pieces were below 90 dB in all one-third octave bands of 20,000 to 80,000 Hz. The average ultrasound level of the ultrasonic scaler was 107 dB at the one-third octave band of 25,000 Hz."
[...]